Mother: You are more Precious than Jewels

She gave life. She is a wife.
She is a mother and she is a friend.
She is a sister, a survivor ’til the end.

Appreciate her, we don’t dare.
Ask her worries, we don’t care.
Wipe away her tears, they are invisible as air.

She works, cooks, and cleans.
She laughs, helps comfort, and hides her pain.
When you struggle, she pulls you through.

All this is her, and what do we do?
Complain and create a mess,
Provide stress and leave her feeling depressed,
Push her away and ignore her advice,
Tell her she is nothing without thinking twice.

She swallows her pride, put her feelings aside.
Does as you need in order for you to be free.
Ignores your ignorance and tolerates your flaws.
You call her names, but
She answers with pride, dignity, and a complete loss of self.
You call her nothing.
I call her Strong, Smart, Sensual, Caring, Giving, Surviving, Tolerant and powerful.
I call her WOMAN!

 “If you can’t go back to your mother’s womb, you’d better learn to be a good fighter.”
― Anchee Min, Red Azalea

25 Everyday Examples of Rape Culture

Chances are, as feminists and other liberal-minded people, most of you have heard the phrase “rape culture.”

Perhaps some people truly don’t understand what rape culture is.

After all, if you’re hearing the phrase for the first time, it can be really confusing.

We understand the word “culture,” from a sociological or anthropological viewpoint, to be things that people commonly engage in together as a society (ranging from the arts to education to table manners), and we find it difficult to link the word “rape” in with that concept.

We know that at its core, our society is not something that outwardly promotes rape, as the phrase could imply. That is, we don’t, after all, “commonly engage” in sexual violence “together as a society.”

To understand rape culture better, first we need to understand that it’s not necessarily a society or group of people that outwardly promotes rape (although it could be).

When we talk about rape culture, we’re discussing something more implicit than that. We’re talking about cultural practices (that, yes, we commonly engage in together as a society) that excuse or otherwise tolerate sexual violence.

We’re talking about the way that we collectively think about rape.

More often than not, it’s situations in which sexual assault, rape, and general violence are ignored, trivialized, normalized, or made into jokes.

And this happens a lot.

All the time.

Every day.

And it’s dangerous in that it is counterproductive to eliminating sexual violence from society.

So what, exactly, does rape culture look like? How does it present itself?

Well, to see what I’m referring to, take a look at the examples below.

Because if we don’t understand the meaning behind the concept of rape culture, or if we have a skewed interpretation of the meaning in our minds, we may find it easy to deny its existence.

And you may think that some of these examples are isolated, one-off situations. But in reality, they’re part of a larger societal trend.

That is rape culture.

Rape Culture Is…

1. A university in Canada that allows the following student orientation chant: “Y is for your sister. O is for oh-so-tight. U is for underage. N is for no consent. G is for grab that ass.”

2. Pop music that tells women “you know you want it” because of these “blurred lines” (of consent).

3. A judge who sentenced only 30 days in jail to a 50-year-old man who raped a 14-year-old girl (who later committed suicide), and defended that the girl was “older than her chronological age

4. Mothers who blame girls for posting sexy selfies and leading their sons into sin, instead of talking with their sons about their responsibility for their own sexual expression.

5. Photo memes like this:

Source: Stupid Bad Memes

6. Supporting athletes who are charged with rape and calling their victims career-destroyers.

7. Companies that create decals of a woman bound and gagged in order to “promote their business.”

8. People who believe that girls “allow themselves to be raped.”

9. Journalists who substitute the word “sex” for “rape” – as if they’re the same thing.

10. Politicians distinguishing legitimate rape” and stating that rape is “something that God intended to happen,” among other horrendous claims.

11. Calling college students who have the courage to report their rapes liars.

12. The ubiquity of street harassment – and how victims are told that they’re “overreacting” when they call it out.

13. Victims not being taken seriously when they report rapes to their university campuses.

14. Rape jokes – and people who defend them.

15. Sexual assault prevention education programs that focus on women being told to take measures to prevent rape instead of men being told not to rape.

16. The victimization of hospital patients, especially people with mental health issues and the elderly,  by the very people who are there to protect them.

17. Reddit threads with titles like “You just have to make sure she’s dead” when linking to the story of a 13-year-old girl in Pakistan being raped and buried alive.

18. Reddit threads dedicated to men causing women pain during sex (I’m not going to give the thread credence by linking to it).

19. Twitter hashtags that support accused rapists and blame victims.

20. Publicly defending celebrities accused of rape just because they’re celebrities and ignoring or denouncing what the victim has to say.

21. Assuming that false reporting for sexual assault cases are the norm, when in reality, they’re only 2-8%, which is on par with grand theft auto.

22. Only 3% of rapists ever serving a day in jail.

23. Women feeling less safe walking the streets at night than men do.

24. 1-in-5 women and 1-in-71 men having reported experiencing rape.

25. The fact that we have to condition ourselves not to use violent language in our everyday conversations.

And the list could go on.

Because examples of rape culture are all around us. They permeate our society at individual, one-on-one levels, as well as in institutionalized, structured ways. That is, after all, exactly how oppression works.

I hope that after reading through the above examples, you have a clearer understanding of what is meant by the phrase “rape culture.” Moreover, I hope that you are more likely to believe in its existence – and to want to fight for its eradication.

Because now that you know what it is, you can work to find ways to prevent it.

You are The Choices that You Make :)

“We Need to Understand, That there is no formula 

for how women should lead their life. 

That is why we must respect their choices

that each women makes for herself and her family.

Every women Deserves a chance To Realize 

her God Given Potential. “

Why Life is so unfair towards girls??

Why people around doesn’t think about the girls perspectives?

Decision Has its own role In everyone’s life.

Why Girls should marry a guy, just because of the family reputation?

If the girl wants to go ahead with her career?

Isn’t it is family’s responsibility to ask her girl whether is she interested in marriage or no?

 

 

I am the Catalayst to my own Happiness

NO,

I don’t Care what you think about me, my Life, My Decisions, or How I Look.

Because Its My Life, My Choices, My Mistakes and My Lessons.

Mind your own Problems Before you talk About Mine,

Because My Life is not your story to tell.

And So now i Will do What’s Best for ME!!!

Her Love <3

 

Her love is overwhelming,
Terrifying, even

She knows things, people,
Feels them to her marrow

Her love wraps around them,
Folding upon itself within her,
Taking up so much space inside,
She sometimes feel as though
She needs to hide from it,
That life and love ask
Far too much of her

Sometimes, the love is so tight inside,
She isn’t sure she can endure it,
So she tries to find a way to escape it,
Just for a while

But the things she needs
To do for herself,
In order to rest her heart and mind,
Hurt the people she loves

Her survival sometimes means
Hurting the people she loves,
Not because she doesn’t love them

But because she loves them too much.

Heartbreaking reality that should shame us

As Said “The beggar wears all colors fearing none. Charles Lamb”

A little Girl gave a beggar on the street a bread from her lunch box..

She said, “Uncle, I saw On discovery Channel that you can grow your own food. So Why don’t You go to The village and Become a Farmer???

 

The Ex Farmer Shed the Tear, Smiling at The Innocence of the child and the Indifference of the Nation…

 

Finally Quoted : “When you share your last crust of bread with a beggar, you mustn’t behave as if you were throwing a bone to a dog. You must give humbly, and thank him for allowing you to have a part in his hunger” . Giovanni Guareschi

India’s Demonetization

India has done this before. In 1946, all 1,000 and 10,000 rupee notes were recalled. In 1978, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 rupee notes were demonetized.

The Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced the radical step to demonetize the currency notes in order to tackle the rampant problem of the so-called “black money” – billions of dollars’ worth of cash in unaccounted wealth and fake currency notes. The government has decided to introduce a new 500 rupee note and also introduce a higher denomination banknote of 2,000 rupees. However, ever since the announcement on November 8, thousands of people have been waiting outside banks to exchange old currency notes for new ones. While analysts and celebrities across the country have applauded this move, the crowds have been getting more and more restless with every passing day.

Demonetization Of Indian Currency To Impact Students Coming To Study In The U.S.: One of the key motivations for demonetization was to flush the black money generated through tax evasion and corruption and take India towards a “cashless economy.” However, cash was also the mechanism of short-term borrowing for many Indian students. Visa approval processes for international students requires showing proof of availability of funds for the first year of tuition and living expenses. Given that total annual expenses can range from US$ 30,000 to US$ 70,000, many Indian students were using short-term borrowing for visa approvals and education abroad.

Modi’s demonetization initiative caused a sudden breakdown in India’s commercial ecosystem. Trade across all facets of the economy was disrupted, and cash-centric sectors like agriculture, fishing, and the voluminous informal market were virtually shut down, with many businesses and livelihoods going under completely — not to mention the economic impact of millions of people standing in line for hours to exchange or deposit canceled banknotes rather than working or doing business..

“In certain parts of the country there used to be always an official amount and an unofficial amount of the property,” Nangia explained. “Now with this so-called black money going out of the window people are expecting that the price of real estate is going to fall, which is going to make it more affordable for honest, tax paying people.”

Results from a much-publicized survey were recently published which claimed that 90% of Indians support the demonetization initiative. However, the methods of this poll are highly suspect, as it was only delivered via a smartphone app — a technology which only 17% of the country has access to — and was also reputedly loaded with “leading questions and a multiple-choice questionnaire that often did not even give users the chance to disagree with the plan.”

“I think the expectation is that for the economy there will be long-term benefits, there will be short-term pain,” Nangia concluded. “The long-term benefits are that there will be more tax compliance, the government will be able to collect more and hence spend more on infrastructure, etc. The short-term pain is that this has gone ahead of the demand.”